Education policy

Zombie stats: “dropout rate” as a case in point

Education has a whole host of statistics that are unreliable, that have been unreliable or unnecessary or off-target for years, and that continue to be created, published, and reported on. “Dropout rate” is one of those. It’s been around for more than forty years, crafted in the late 1960s when there was no way to […]

Can sampling save high-stakes testing?

m4s0n501 Over the weekend, the Washington Post‘s Valerie Strauss described one Colorado school district’s proposal to test a sample of children for accountability purposes. Proposals something like this float up occasionally: let’s not test all children in all subjects but a sample. Sometimes the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) sampling plan is used as […]

Three book recommendations et alia

I haven’t gone this long without a blog entry in … hmmn. Don’t know how long, maybe not since 2003. My wife was hospitalized in late August, and until she came home last Wednesday, I have been juggling essential tasks like mad and jettisoning whatever was absolutely unnecessary for the time being.1 She’s much better, thank you, and […]

All a-Twitter about David Kirp

In my Twitter timeline yesterday, I saw a number of people I follow either delighted or highly irritated by David Kirp’s fairly general op-ed yesterday, Teaching Is Not a Business. On the irritated front was Rick Hess: Kirp's made a lucrative habit of fatuous "reform bad" pablum he spouts in new NYT piece. "Teaching Is Not […]

Elected vs. appointed state chiefs

Over the last weekend, the Arizona Republic published an op-ed by conservative education writer Matthew Ladner, arguing for an appointed state superintendent. Arizona has an elected superintendent, like California. Florida has a commissioner of education appointed by the state board of education, itself appointed by the governor; before 2002, the position was elected. The majority of […]