The academic life

Michael B. Katz

My advisor was Michael Katz, a social historian who taught and wrote about education, social structure, cities, poverty, and public policy at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, York University, and the University of Pennsylvania from the late 1960s until his death this past week.

Miscellaneous notes on the transition to Arizona

June 30 is technically my last day as a faculty member at the University of South Florida. I’ve been unpaid for June and living in Arizona for a little over two weeks, and my official USF emails have dwindled to a trickle, mostly erroneous bureaucratic missives (TRAVEL AUTHORIZATION FOR SOMEONE IN A DEPARTMENT THAT YOU […]

Theory tic complaints about teacher ed

U.S. Secretary of Education spoke with Andrea Mitchell Friday about new teacher-education regulations that the U.S. Department of Education is preparing for a set of federal financial supports for teacher preparation programs. Most of the verbiage that you will read and hear will focus on tracking the impact of program graduates on K-12 student learning, a focus […]

Join the Digital Inhumanities

Over the past decade, the renewed connections between digital manipulation and traditional humanities has led to a renaissance in the quantification of the unquantifiable, the digitization of the uncountable, and the encoding of the ineffable. It is high time that we encapsulate this academic movement in a term that will be broadly recognizable, attractive to […]

Writing an anonymous patronizing column is not mentoring

Almost a decade ago, the Chronicle of Higher Education published a column by “Ivan Tribble” (a pseudonym), slamming the growth of blogs written by fellow scholars (and bluntly saying that as far as he was concerned, “bloggers need not apply” to his institution). Last week, the Chronicle published another anonymous column by a senior scholar, […]