Politics

Another era of complicated state K-12 system lawsuits?

That’ll teach me to write last month about why no one is challenging Florida’s large voucher programs: by the end of the month, those voucher programs became part of an amended complaint filed by the lawyers in a “sweeping lawsuit” claiming Florida’s K-12 system is currently being run unconstitutionally (sweeping is the word used by the […]

The ultimate LIFO

I’ve been trying to carve out time this week to read José Vilson’s This Is Not a Test, and also continue with Thomas Piketty. The combination of the two has sparked a few musings in the back of my mind, including the fact that someone else has noted, that Piketty’s hundreds-of-pages-long book doesn’t have much […]

Don Heller, debt, and the debt-crisis discourse

On Thursday, Valerie Strauss published a commentary on college-debt debate by Don Heller, the dean of Michigan State’s College of Education. The gist of Heller’s remark is that it is hyperbolic and unproductive to term the status of college-student and -alumni debt a crisis because the total indebtnedness that is allocated to college loans has crossed […]

Occam’s Conspiracy Theory

I am having a hard time wrapping my head around the persistence of conspiracy theories, whether related to the Common Core or education policy more generally. Wrestling with conspiracy theories and the like matter; as Jonathan Martin’s New York Times article on GOP Common Core politics shows, education policymaking involves all sorts of claims: legitimate, fuzzy, and easily […]

Why does Senator Elizabeth Warren repeat a (fairly new but inaccurate) canard?

University of Wisconsin sociologist Sara Goldrick-Rab, AFT President Randy Weingarten, and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren are at a forum on student debt this morning. Goldrick-Rab just asked on Twitter why Warren sticks to her rhetorical position that the federal government “profits” from student loans: Not sure why @SenWarren wants to suggest fed govt profits from […]